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Prevent Together Blog!

  • 16 Feb 2016 10:18 AM | Adrienne Hoffman-Lewis (Administrator)

    Dr. Janet Rosenzweig shares her analysis of a study published online in JAMA Pediatrics that examined the rate of children exposed to abuse in youth-serving organizations. While this post was written for the public and is not a comprehensive analysis, Dr. Rosenzweig shares her thoughts, concerns, and suggestions for parents based on the results of the study. Click here to read the full post on Philly.com.

  • 06 Jan 2016 9:16 AM | Adrienne Hoffman-Lewis (Administrator)
    The National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), PreventConnect/California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (PreventConnect/CALCASA) and the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence (NAESV) have established a new partnership (The National Partners) in order to increase visibility of, and access to, sexual violence prevention expertise. This initiative has received seed funding from the National Football League (NFL) to coordinate prevention, policy, and messaging efforts; establish a presence in the Washington, DC metro area; and to award grants to advance a variety of promising practices and policies that can be replicated.

     

    Purpose

    To fund promising practices or policies that are replicable and that:

    • improve the response to victims of sexual violence;
    • reduce the likelihood of perpetration of sexual violence; or
    • strengthen communities’ capacity to create safe environments

    Funding Categories

    • Services or advocacy for people who have been sexually victimized
    • Strategies for reducing the likelihood of people to sexually offend
    • Organizational, systemic, or community-level prevention strategies

    Eligible Applicants: 

    501(c)3 organizations who have experience with addressing and/or preventing sexual violence.

    Deadline for Intent to Submit form:  January 22, 2016

    Process:

    We are now inviting brief descriptions as the first step in the application process.

    Access to the Intent to Submit form.

    Additional Information: including grant announcement, guidelinesapplication, and frequently asked questions

     



  • 10 Dec 2015 1:02 PM | Janet Rosenzweig

    Find thoughts for parents on  how holiday hugs can offer important lessons! 

    bit.ly/1NdTMVp


  • 10 Dec 2015 1:02 PM | Janet Rosenzweig

    Find thoughts for parents on  how holiday hugs can offer important lessons! 

    bit.ly/1NdTMVp



  • 08 Dec 2015 10:24 AM | Adrienne Hoffman-Lewis (Administrator)

    December 4, 2015: 

    Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment releases, "Dancing through the puddles to eradicate sexual harm” talking prevention with Cordelia Anderson. 

    Excerpt: 

    Cordelia has been working in the field of sexual harm for nearly 40 years traversing the landscapes of research, treatment and victim advocacy with a focus on prevention, reduction and support. Cordelia believes that the best way to prevent sexual harm is to fully understand its causes, the perpetrators and its victims; we need a holistic, informed and multi-dimensional approach. In order to develop a shared, systematic approach to preventing sexual harm we need to recognise that that what are often seen as different [opposing] sides of the sexual harm field [treatment providers vs. victim advocates vs. criminal justice professionals vs. the ‘public’] are not actually opposed, instead they are actually complementary and we need to get better at drawing them together through language as well as action. Which means that in order to prevent sexual harm we need to be able to see the being picture, we have to be able to dance between the disciplinary ‘puddles’ [like Cordelia has across her career], or get out of our silos, of sexual harm......

  • 24 Nov 2015 10:46 AM | Adrienne Hoffman-Lewis (Administrator)

    ECPAT-USA releases the “Steps to Safety” report analyzing Safe Harbor Laws (2015).

    Adapted summary: Safe Harbor laws protect children who become victims of sex trafficking by ensuring they are treated as victims, not criminals. With its easy-to-use checklist and guidance for state legislators it is a useful tool for anyone seeking to pass strong Safe Harbor laws. The report covers 19 states and the District of Columbia. It covers the broad spectrum from states with minimalistic laws to highly detailed. This report will help ensure each state has a detailed and comprehensive law in place. ECPAT-USA will lend its support to help make this a reality. 


  • 22 Oct 2015 8:40 AM | Adrienne Hoffman-Lewis (Administrator)

    Adapted summary: Free Webinar - Expected and Unexpected Funding Partnerships to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse on Thursday, November 11 at 11amPT/1pmCT/2pmET

    Almost all of us will agree that investing in prevention is essential if we are truly committed to ending child sexual abuse.  But the US, in fact most countries, have not committed significant funds to prevention.  With presenters from a variety of perspectives, this web conference will discuss some likely and unlikely places where funds have been invested in preventing sexual violence.

    This session is part of the 2015-2016 #PowerInPrevention Ending Child Sexual Abuse web conference series hosted by PreventConnect along with leading child sexual abuse prevention experts Cordelia Anderson and Joan Tabachnick.  



  • 12 Oct 2015 8:14 AM | Adrienne Hoffman-Lewis (Administrator)

    BGCA is excited about our first national symposium to explore those issues that will help drive greater collaboration across all organizations and agencies for the protection of youth.


    2015 Safer Childhoods Symposium:
    Your Contributions Will Be Critical

    Registration is open for the Safer Childhoods Symposium for youth-serving organizations. The registration fee is $150. (A limited number of scholarships are available.)

    Join safety experts from leading youth-serving organizations to gain practical takeaways that can be put to immediate use to improve the emotional and physical safety of out-of-school time programs.

    November 4-5, 2015 at Cox Communications Inc., Headquarters in Atlanta, Ga.

    Featured Speakers

    • Keith Kaufman, Ph. D., Author and Researcher, Portland State University (Oregon)
    • Antigone Davis, Head of Global Safety, Facebook
    • Dr. Kenneth Ginsburg, M.D., Adolescent Medicine Specialist, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
    • Georgia Hall, Ph. D., Senior Research Scientist, National Institute on Out-of-School Time

    Highlights

    • Review models to prevent and manage out-of-school time risks and improve safety
    • Explore practical aspects of disseminating and implementing effective safety approaches in youth service environments
    • Take away practical tools and emerging strategies applicable across several risk areas

    For additional information, contact Mitru Ciarlante of the Safer Childhoods Network at saferchildhoods@bgca.org or 610-657-1542.



  • 30 Sep 2015 10:10 AM | Adrienne Hoffman-Lewis (Administrator)

    From the National Crittenton Foundation: Gender Injustice: System-Level Juvenile Justice Reforms for Girls

    Despite decades of attention, the proportion of girls in the juvenile justice system has increased and their challenges have remained remarkably consistent, resulting in deeply rooted systemic gender injustice. The literature is clear that girls in the justice system have experienced abuse, violence, adversity, and deprivation across many of the domains of their lives—family, peers, intimate partners, and community. There is also increasing understanding of the sorts of programs helpful to these girls. What is missing is a focus on how systems—and particularly juvenile justice systems—can be redesigned to protect public safety and support the healing and healthy development of girls and young women.

    Juvenile justice systems reform is occurring across the country as a result of a growing understanding of developmental and neurological differences between youth and adults, the high cost of incarceration, and the consistent failure of a punitive juvenile justice model. However, even as systems are initiating reforms and changing their approach, they are routinely failing to modify those reforms for girls or even to collect data on how girls, specifically, are affected by the problems they are seeking to remedy. As a result, the particular impact on girls of failures in the juvenile justice system is not understood and few juvenile reforms are tailored to girls’ needs and pathways into the system— meaning girls and young women are unlikely to fully benefit from system reforms.

    Many of the problems discussed in this report are not unique to girls—and many of the suggested paths forward can benefit both boys and girls. However, because girls are frequently left out of reform discussions, an intentional focus on girls is needed to ensure that they fully benefit from system reforms. Indeed, in writing this report we were struck by the number of promising national and large-scale juvenile justice reform efforts that have not fully considered the role of gender in the problems they address or in the solutions they propose. If this intentional gender focus does not coexist with current large-scale system reforms, an important opportunity for gender justice and equity and developmental system reforms will be missed.

    - See more at: http://www.nationalcrittenton.org/gender-injustice/#sthash.1hGPsTrD.dpuf


  • 30 Sep 2015 8:25 AM | Adrienne Hoffman-Lewis (Administrator)
    The U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) is excited to convene the second Human Trafficking Survivor Forum in Washington, D.C., in January 2016. As part of OVC’s ongoing commitment to meaningful engagement with survivors of human trafficking, this Survivor Forum is an opportunity for survivors to share their perspectives on effective, victim-centered strategies in federal anti-trafficking initiatives. OVC invites human trafficking survivors from across the United States to submit a Statement of Interest (SOI) to participate in the Forum. Because space is limited, 15 to 20 survivors of human trafficking will be selected to participate in the 1-day Forum. If you are not selected to attend this Forum, OVC encourages you to remain involved in this effort through future opportunities.

    Survivors may complete the SOI individually or with the assistance of organizations, caregivers, friends, or family members. Please note that submitting an SOI does not confirm attendance.
     
    If invited to participate, time and travel costs for attendance, including airfare, ground transportation, lodging, meals, and incidentals, will be paid up to the maximum allowable amount set by the Department of Justice.
     
    Please share this information with anyone who may be interested in participating. If you are a survivor and interested in participating in the Survivor Forum, please complete the online form, or complete the Word document and e-mail it to humantrafficking@ovcttac.org or fax it to 703–225–2338.
      
    Submissions are due by October 6, 2015, in order to be considered.

    If you have any questions or need additional information, please e-mail humantrafficking@ovcttac.org or call 1–866–682–8880.
     
    Thank you in advance for your interest and assistance in helping make this Forum a great event.


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