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  • 16 Sep 2019 10:47 AM | Anonymous

    Marcus Erooga, Ph.D. and Prevention Coalition member, Keith Kaufman, Ph.D., have edited a special issue on the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse for the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. This edition includes an article co-authored by Prevention Coalition members, Joan Tabachnick and Jenny Coleman focused on member Stop It Now’s work.

    The issue offers insights into a variety of important emerging issues in our field.  According to their introduction: 

    This Special Edition brings together innovative research from leading figures in their field of work from the USA, UK and Australia. With its focus on prevention, it is designed to highlight a broad international sample of cutting-edge child sexual abuse prevention thinking, intended to both spur additional prevention research and sharing these creative approaches to preventing sexual abuse.  

    The chapters include:  

    Table of Contents
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence- Volume: 34, Number: 20 (October 2019):
    https://bit.ly/2keWVAs


    Introduction to Special Issue on Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse: https://bit.ly/2kEOPB4

     

    Recommendations for Preventing Child Sexual Abuse in Youth-Serving Organizations: Implications From an Australian Royal Commission Review of the Literature: https://bit.ly/2maf3vS

     

    “I Didn’t Know Where To Go”: An Examination of Stop It Now!’s Sexual Abuse Prevention Helpline: https://bit.ly/2lGQgiQ


    Is Preventive Treatment for Individuals With Sexual Interest in Children Viable in a Discretionary Reporting Context: https://bit.ly/2kD09xK


    “I Could Never Work With Those People . . . ”: Secondary Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse Via a Brief Training for Therapists About Pedophilia: https://bit.ly/2m979Tt


    What Deters Child Sex Offenders? A Comparison Between Completed and Noncompleted Offenses: https://bit.ly/2m5qox6


    Sexual Abuse Prevention Education in Australian Primary Schools: A National Survey of Programs: https://bit.ly/2lOKf3p


  • 15 Jul 2019 10:13 AM | Anonymous

    The Prevention Coalition has just completed its year-long social media campaign focusing on each of the Six Pillars of Prevention, a prevention framework developed by the Coalition. For the next six months the Prevention Coalition will focus its social media on prevention strategies suggested by members. If you follow our Twitter feed you will see expert suggestions and comments that are based on Prevention Coalition email threads. Watch for new email questions from the Prevention Coalition in August if you would like to participate.

     If you don’t follow the Prevention Coalition on Twitter (@PreventTogether), be sure to start today. Please also take the time to like and retweet the great content our members have provided. Check out our website and blogs at www.preventtogether.org and our Linked In site at www.linkedin.com . Some of our favorite tweets for the month of July include:

     

    .@PreventTogether member and prevention expert, Anthony Rizzuto, believes that easy and inexpensive accessibility to information, particularly for youth serving organizations, is critical to preventing the perpetration of abuse. #preventcsa

     

    .@PreventTogether member, Carol Smolenski of ECPAT, points out that addressing demand in the adult sex industry also helps protect children. #preventcsa

     

    Children are not the sum of their behaviors: punitive and one-size-fits-all interventions for youth exhibiting sexual behavior problems are not proven effective. @MakeSocietySafe has 5 things you should know http://www.atsa.com/infographic #preventcsa #HealthyKids

     

    .@PreventTogether member, Dr Keith Kaufman, points out that efforts must be made to address the situational risks that allow abuse/exploitation to occur in youth serving orgs. Often these risks go unnoticed or unaddressed. #preventcsa

     


  • 06 May 2019 9:43 AM | Anonymous

    The Prevention Coalition’s Six Pillars of Prevention is a guiding document that outlines six critical components for the prevention of abuse. Through these Pillars, the Prevention Coalition is hoping to build a dialogue around the creation of a comprehensive policy agenda to benefit children and prevent sexual abuse.

    There is no one policy that can combat child sexual abuse and exploitation. As such, the Prevention Coalition chose instead to identify six areas in which policies can have the most impact on prevention. The Six Pillars are:

                        I.            Strengthen Youth Serving Organizations (YSOs) sexual abuse and exploitation prevention capacity,

                      II.            Support the healthy development of children,

                     III.            Promote healthy relationships and sexuality education for children and youth,

                    IV.            End the demand for children as sexual commodities,

                      V.            Have sustainable funds for prevention, and

                    VI.            Prevent initial perpetration of child sexual abuse and exploitation.

    Suggested citation: National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation. (2015). Six Pillars for Prevention. Retrieved from www.preventtogether.org 

    Over the last ten months, the Prevention Coalition has focused its social media on Pillars II – VI. To cap off the year-long Six Pillars campaign, the Prevention Coalition is concentrating its May-June social media on Strengthening Youth Serving Organizations (YSOs).

    In furtherance of Pillar I, the Prevention Coalition advocates for special attention to stronger policies and best practices within YSOs in order to further reduce the potential for someone to perpetrate sexual abuse or exploitation within these organizations. Simultaneously, at the community, state and federal levels, the Prevention Coalition advocates for policies that encourage all types of YSOs (e.g., leisure, camps, schools, sports) to actively institute child sexual abuse and exploitation prevention initiatives that address face-to-face as well as technology-facilitated interactions.

    Prevention Coalition member, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America is “sponsoring” the Strengthening Youth Serving Organizations Pillar. Thank you to Julie Novak, Vice President of Youth Protection, for her perspective on this important subject. Thank you also to the Prevention Coalition thought leaders who answered the question “What are the three best prevention strategies for youth serving organizations?” The array of answers is fascinating.

    The Prevention Coalition encourages its members to use these pillars as a tool to influence the conversation about a comprehensive prevention policy agenda and to expand what is currently considered as relevant prevention policy. The Coalition hopes these pillars are useful to expand the conversation and strategic planning around prevention-related policies in communities across the country.

    The views and information provided in materials and products developed for or disseminated by the National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation do not necessarily represent the opinions of the individual members or organizations that make up the Prevention Coalition.


  • 28 Feb 2019 1:46 PM | Anonymous

    Pillar Four: End the Demand for Children as Sexual Commodities

    In March and April, the Prevention Coalition will be focusing its social media on ending the demand for children as sexual commodities. “End the Demand” is a wide-ranging subject that includes everything from addressing underage prostitution to changing societal norms defined by advertising and other cultural factors.

    Prevention Coalition member, Cordelia Anderson, MA, is the primary content provider for the “End the Demand” campaign. Cordelia is an expert in this area, and offers programs on the subject through her consulting firm, Sensibilities, Inc. Also providing content is Prevention Coalition member, the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (ATSA). Their perspective and knowledge in preventing re-offending among sexual abusers is invaluable. Thank you to these sponsors!

    Some of the social media topics that will be included:

    ·         Visits to Pornhub – which is only ONE website - totaled 33.5 billion over the course of 2018, an increase of 5 billion visits over 2017.  https://tinyurl.com/ybztgdbp

    ·         Our communities deserve evidence-based laws, policies, public education, and behavioral interventions that enhance community safety and minimize the risk of an individual sexually reoffending.https://tinyurl.com/y57hhy4e

    ·         The Sex Buyer Act in five European countries includes the criminalization of buying sex acts, the decriminalization of selling sex acts and support services for those exploited. https://tinyurl.com/y3xky97p

    ·         Yesterday’s pornography is today’s main stream media and pornography” – Cordelia Anderson.

    ·         In most modern societies, sex is ubiquitously commoditized. Advertisements—whether for vodka or a cell phone—link sex to consumption. https://tinyurl.com/y2rtdvo3

    ·         [The US Justice Department of Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS)]works to deter and eradicate the production, distribution and possession of child pornography.https://tinyurl.com/jmkavop

     


  • 07 Jan 2019 10:32 AM | Anonymous

    An often-overlooked tenet of the Six Pillars for Prevention is developing adequate and sustainable funding for prevention. Without funding, most efforts to advocate for the healthy development of children, strengthen youth serving organizations in the development of standards and policy or end the demand for children as sexual commodities are for naught. Developing sustainable funding is an important precursor to a viable program to prevent child sexual abuse.

     

    In January and February, the Prevention Coalition is exploring this subject on social media. This campaign is being sponsored by Committee for Children. This organization is a leader in developing federal and state funding for the prevention of child sexual abuse. Many thanks to Melina Rozzisi and Jordan Posamentier of Committee for Children for their content and guidance, and to Nicole Epps and Zoe Persson of World Childhood Foundation for their work developing tweets around this subject.

     

    Committee for Children is inviting Prevention Coalition members to a Congressional Briefing being held in Washington, DC on January 29th.

     

    Child Sexual Abuse Prevention &

    the Need for Evidence Based Response 

     

    Tuesday, January 29, 2019

    1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

    385 Senate Russell Office Building

     

    Featured Presenters Include

    Moderator, Joan Duffell

    Executive Director, Committee for Children

     

    Deborah Chosewood

    Deputy Director, Prevention and Community Support Section

    Georgia Division of Family and Children Services

     

    Dr. Elizabeth Letourneau

    Director, Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse

    John’s Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

     

    Dr. James Mercy

    Director, Division of Violence Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

     

    C.T. Wilson

    Maryland State Delegate

     

    RSVP by January 26th to ahall@bpagdc.com

     


  • 08 Nov 2018 2:08 PM | Anonymous

    Reflections

    By Cordelia Anderson, MA, Prevention Consultant & founding Chair of the National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse & Exploitation.

     

     In 1976 when I began my career - Jimmy Carter defeated incumbent Gerald Ford for US Presidency, Alex Haley’s book “Roots” came out, the Album of the year was “Still Crazy After All These Years,” by Paul Simon and the Record of the Year was “Love Will Keep Us Together” by Captain and Tennille.

    I had boundless energy and I wanted to do sexuality education. I was able to teach a ten-week sexuality course to women in the criminal justice system. This led to seeing a significant percentage of them whose histories included trauma from being sexually abused as children. I also got a part-time job as a research assistant on a legislatively mandated study on the effectiveness of sex offender treatment – this work was new, radical and there weren’t many programs to compare with nationwide. The same year, an incest survivor started Christopher Street, an incest treatment program in Minneapolis. Survivors who were raped as adults had begun to speak out, but there was still precious little attention to children. At the time, the efforts related to child abuse and child welfare, technically included child sexual abuse (CSA), but these efforts paid it little attention. Clearly, there were those traumatized from being sexually abused as children whose voices weren’t being heard.  In 1977, the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office Sexual Assault Services (HCAO) program got a grant to hire me to help prepare child victims for court (pre-Children’s Advocacy Centers and the science of forensic interviewing) and to develop a child sexual abuse prevention program. Around that time, a few other prevention programs were launching around the country. In 1980, I along with the program moved out of the HCAO and into Illusion Theater.  Attention to this issue was growing and we had coauthored a play called TOUCH and were touring nationally. That same year we got federal funding from the former National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect to provide technical assistance to five other CSA prevention sites around the country.

    When I left the theater in 1992 and started my own consulting business, I wanted to work to advance prevention in as many ways as possible. I was interested in spreading information, not only about individual programs already available, but also focusing on systemic and cultural changes needed beyond education and training efforts.  I consulted with a broad range of local, regional and national organization. In 1997 I joined the board of National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. In 2005, I was asked to take a leave of absence from serving on the board to develop a prevention advisory committee. It quickly became clear that what was really needed was an independent national coalition of agencies and leaders doing this work. I became the founding chair of what is now the National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation and served that role for several years.  To create a strong working coalition between the many organizations, individuals, and perspectives at the table, we worked to build relationships, to articulate shared values, and then together we were able to develop a national plan and prevention fact sheets. Later we focused more on one aspect of the national plan – policy - and developed 6 pillars of prevention policy.

    A few years ago, I pulled back from my intensive, active involvement in the Coalition but continued to develop resources to support these important prevention efforts. Between 2015-2017, I worked with Just Beginnings Collaborative, (JBC), the first foundation to focus exclusively on child sexual abuse, to research and write a report on the status of U.S.A based Child Sexual Abuse Services and Prevention Programs.  It was a humbling experience. I thought I had a good handle on what was happening in the field, but I soon learned that programs had expanded their understanding of this complex issue and were offering more depth, expanded opportunities for actions and attention to the lived experiences of everyone involved in this issue. I also had the opportunity to engage with both new programs and leaders focusing on communities of color that were far from represented in more visible programs and funding streams. I gained a deeper understanding of how separate we are still working and of how many people are doing incredibly important related work that were not familiar with each other or each other’s work. The 350-page report was left in a draft version (which I’m happy to share with anyone interested). The JBC plans to turn the content into a comprehensive online platform, that could easily be accessed and updated, changed when leadership changed within JBC. Such a platform is still needed and may be a great undertaking for this Coalition.

    In the last few years, with more visibility to the #MeToo movement (launched over a decade ago by Tarana Burke) and with funding from Raliance and others to focus on preventing the development of sexually harmful behaviors and perpetration, there is a completely different level of public discourse and possibility for significant change than ever before - despite political setbacks. I also find much of my early work has come full circle and that I’m back addressing historic trauma from decades old cases and arguing for restorative/transformative approaches – which was an intense focus for me in the 1990’s. While some things are very different in this field now (e.g. technology facilitated sexual harm and sex crimes against children, , access to online pornography and so many doing this work that its challenging to stay current), other aspects remain the same (e.g., the need to name the harm; the need to fight to change the conditions that make the sexual abuse and exploitation of children likely instead of unlikely; the need to address the intersections between all forms of oppression and entitlements; the need to understand the difference between healthy and expected sexual behaviors and those that are harmful or destructive; and finally, the need to invest in wellness so that those who do this work can be as healthy as possible as individuals and organizations).

    At the October 2018 annual Coalition meeting, I looked around and realized there were several people I didn’t know.  After decades of this work, it was odd to not know everyone; – as I step back from my work, it is very exciting to see these new faces and hear these new voices -- and both are completely necessary.  At the meeting I acknowledged that in June 2019, I will be stepping away from my 42 years of work to prevent child sexual abuse/exploitation and sexual violence. It is time.  I can see there are many others who have the qualifications, the passion, and the insights and who can do this important work.  In so many ways, we have Roots, and remain “still crazy after all these years” – in our fight for children and justice. We also know relationships matter – we need each other and indeed “Love will keep us together.”

    *******

    A special thanks to Julie Patrick who initially was hired by NCMEC to support my work with the Coalition. Julie’s skills and support were essential.  Thanks to all of you for your support over the years (and at the last Coalition meeting) and for what you contribute to the Coalition. Finally, thank you for the opportunity to serve on this important Coalition. I know it is in good hands.


  • 01 Nov 2018 2:51 PM | Anonymous

    During the months of November and December, the Prevention Coalition will be focusing its communications efforts on Pillar for Prevention #2: The Healthy Development of Children

    There is a plethora of research that demonstrates that perpetrators of sexual abuse often seek out vulnerable children. Resilient, informed and healthy children are far less likely to be sexually abused. It follows that an important strategy for preventing sexual abuse is providing parents and other adults with information and tips on fostering the healthy development and sexuality of children.

    Many of our members have contributed content and resources to this communications campaign. Thank you to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), Stop It Now!, the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers (ATSA), and Janet Rosenzweig, Ph.D.

    If you don’t follow the Prevention Coalition on Twitter (@PreventTogether), be sure to start today. Please also take the time to like and retweet the great content our members have provided.


  • 09 Oct 2018 2:55 PM | Anonymous

    by Dr. Janet Rosenzweig

    With everyone talking about teen on teen sex, parents should be too!

    Perhaps 20 percent of American homes tuned in, one way or another, to the hearing Thursday in which a woman described being  the survivor of sexual abuse 35 years ago  to   the U.S. Senate, the American people and the man she accused, a nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court. It’s hard to imagine that most people weren’t exposed to it, and the hearing may have riveted you and your children.

    It doesn’t matter whether you believe the accuser, Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, or Judge Brett Kavanaugh – this is an excellent time to have a conversation with your teenaged and pre-teen children about how a man should behave, and how a woman should stand up for herself. You should do this at home,  and you should  check in with the  educational and social organizations that serve your children to encourage them to do so as well.

    Let’s start at home, where the seeds of sexual health and safety are planted. For parents, this is a teachable moment, building on past conversations about empathy, trust, boundaries and sexuality. If you’ve never had these conversations, start now. Even if you don’t think your child is listening, there is good research to show that parents underestimate the value that their children place on their opinions about sexuality.

    • For your sons: Any disrespect toward women diminish a man in that moment and forever. Girls are not objects  to be lusted after or sought after as a challenge,  and  initiating a sexual acts  of  any kinds sex using either physical force or dishonesty is as disrespectful as can be.  It can leave terrible scars  that may be totally incomprehensible to a boy, for whom sex may seem  game or a challenge.
    • For your daughters, this is a moment to make it clear that your love and support are ferocious on her behalf, that you will believe what she tells you and that she must not endure the pain of abuse alone and without pursuing justice. She was at a party? She thinks it was somehow her fault because she felt aroused for a moment?
    • Ensure that your child understands that sexual arousal is an autonomic response, and no matter when or where he or she find themselves experiencing arousal, it is nobody’s responsibility but their own. A person can experience arousal and still be a victim.
    • All kids need to learn that  no  person exists to serve his or her  needs, sexual or otherwise.
    • And to state the obvious, take every step you possibly can to ensure that your child neither hosts nor participates in unsupervised parties, ever.

    Even if you’ve never spoken about sex with your children, you can use this moment to start the conversation about sexual health and safety in a non-judgmental way. For instance: “I know a lot of people are reacting to the Senate hearings, listening to a woman describe being abused, and I’d like to know what you think about it.” Listen carefully without interrupting; prompt a recalcitrant child with “What are your friends saying?” or “What have you seen online?” Even if they don’t want to discuss their feelings with you, you can say, “In our family, we don’t ever want anyone to behave the way the boy might have, or for someone who has been hurt to keep silent.” These messages can be modified to fit children of all ages, but the message is the same; your children should consider the impact of their behavior on others, and to come to you if they’ve been hurt.

    It’s hard to imagine that any child would want to grow up and experience what either Dr. Ford or Judge Kavanaugh faced in those hearings; this is a great time to promote healthy discussions and for schools and youth-serving organizations to do their part. Start by becoming aware of the responsibility to create a healthy sexual climate, in which every adult in the school models respect and calls out violators. Schools should avoid enforcing the peer group distinctions that are fundamental to adolescents – just because adolescents form themselves into tribes doesn’t mean adults should reinforce that

    We don’t know yet whether any benefit will accrue to Dr. Ford, Judge Kavanaugh or the country from this painful, divisive moment. But perhaps the best that can be said of it is that you can create a conversation and a lesson that will benefit your children for decades to come.

    For more resources on talking to children, follow these links:

    For parents:

    American Academy of Pediatricians

    Talking to children about sex https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradeschool/puberty/Pages/Talking-to-Your-Child-About-Sex.aspx

    Talking to teens about date rape https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/teen/dating-sex/Pages/Date-Rape.aspx

    The National Sexual Violence Resource Center materials on prevention https://www.nsvrc.org/safety-prevention

    Dr. Janet Rosenzweig is the Executive Director of  The American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children  and the author of The Sex-Wise Parent  and   The Parent’s Guide to Talking About Sex: A Complete Guide to Raising (Sexually) Safe, Smart, and Healthy Children.  For more information, read her blog, follow @JanetRosenzweig on Twitter or contact DrRosenzweig@sexwiseparent.com to schedule a program for your school or community group


  • 03 Sep 2018 1:15 PM | Anonymous

    Promoting Healthy Relationships and Sexuality Education for Children

    The “Six Pillars of Prevention” is a framework for the prevention of child sexual abuse. Understanding that no one policy can combat the full scope of child sexual abuse and exploitation, the Prevention Coalition has identified these six areas, or Pillars, in which new and improved policies can have the most impact. The Six Pillars are:

    1.            Strengthen Youth Serving Organizations’ (YSOs) sexual abuse and exploitation prevention capacity,

    2.            Support the healthy development of children,

    3.            Promote healthy relationships and sexuality education for children and youth,

    4.            End the demand for children as sexual commodities,

    5.            Have sustainable funds for prevention, and

    6.            Prevent initial perpetration of child sexual abuse and exploitation.

     

    In September and October 2018, the Prevention Coalition will examine Pillar Three, Promoting Healthy Relationships and Sexuality Education for Children. The Prevention Coalition will use social media – tweets, blogs, and emails – to bring the message of Pillar Three to Prevention Coalition members, youth-serving professionals, parents, and the public.

    The World Childhood Foundation is leading this effort. This is fitting because the World Childhood Foundation works to support the development of solutions to prevent and address violence, defend children’s rights, and promote better living conditions for children. The World Childhood Foundation has supported over 1,000 projects in 25 countries and served over 71,000 clients in the U.S. alone during 2016-2017.

    Other Prevention Coalition members will provide content to promote this Pillar. Janet Rosenzweig, MS, PhD, MPA, is Executive Director of American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children and consults to promote sexual health and safety for families, communities, schools, and organizations. She is the author of The Sex-Wise Parent: The Parent’s Guide to Protecting Your Child, Strengthening Your Family, and Talking to Kids About Sex, Abuse, and Bullying. The Georgia Center for Child Advocacy coordinates a state-wide initiative to prevent child sexual abuse and exploitation. They are providing a great deal of first-hand experience with healthy development and sexuality education.

    By promoting the Six Pillars, the Prevention Coalition hopes to start a dialogue that will lead to meaningful policy changes that improve the safety of children and families everywhere.


  • 30 Aug 2018 10:45 AM | Anonymous

    The Prevention Coalition Starts a Conversation About Preventing the Perpetration of Child Sexual Abuse

    Why is it so hard for the public and the media to understand that child sexual abuse can be prevented? During the recent media blitz over the grand jury report about child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church in Pennsylvania, we watched survivor after survivor tell their story. It was heart wrenching. But why was the prevention of child sexual abuse not a piece of the narrative?

    Whether we interrupt the thought process of someone at risk for abusing children, educate children and adults about child sexual abuse, or put policies in place that remove children from the circumstances that lead to abuse, we are preventing perpetration. We are stopping abuse before it happens. We are sparing children the terrible pain that the survivors of the Catholic Church abuse in Pennsylvania suffered.

    The Prevention Coalition is committed to taking steps to make the public understand that prevention is possible. The Prevention Coalition’s “Six Pillars of Prevention” are a great framework for the prevention of child sexual abuse. The Sixth Pillar of Prevention – “Preventing Perpetration” – is particularly important.

    During the months of July and August, the Prevention Coalition focused its efforts on publicizing Pillar Six: “Preventing Perpetration”. There have been daily tweets and weekly blogs on the subject. The effort has been led by Jenny Coleman of Stop It Now! This is apropos because Stop It Now! is one of very few organizations that provides a helpline for those who are at risk of abusing children, in addition to educating adults and families about preventing child sexual abuse. Visit www.stopitnow.org for more information.

    In August, Ann Snyder of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers authored a blog closely related to this subject. She pointed out that capturing the attention of media will require that we learn to pivot the conversation away from the noise of current events to prevention. She provided many real-life examples of how to do this. This is a powerful tool in the prevention toolbox. To see her blog, click here,  http://www.preventtogether.com/blog/6578059

     

    Over the next year, the Prevention Coalition will examine each Pillar in depth, highlighting members who make significant contributions to a particular Pillar and its policy issues. The Third Pillar “Promoting Healthy Relationships and Sexuality Education for Children and Youth” is being sponsored by the World Childhood Foundation in September and October.

     

    It is our hope that the dialogue the Prevention Coalition seeks to advance with the “Six Pillars” will lead to meaningful policy changes that will make a positive impact on the lives and children and families.


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